What month were you born in?

Here's the flower that goes with you!

January Birth Flower - the Snowdrop
February Birth Flower - the African Violet
March Birth Flower - the Jonquil (aka Daffodil or Narcissus)
April Birth Flower - the Sweet pea
May Birth Flower - the Lily of the Valley

June Birth Flower - the Rose
July Birth Flower - the Larkspur
August Birth Flower - the Gladiolus
September Birth Flower - the Aster
October Birth Flower - the Calendula (Marigold)
November Birth Flower - the Chrysanthemum
December Birth Flower - the Holly


January - Snowdrop

 

Snowdrops are among the earliest garden flowers to blossom in the spring. Celebrated as a sign of spring, snowdrops can form impressive carpets of white in areas where they are native or have been naturalized.  All species of Galanthus are perennial, herbaceous plants which grow from bulbs.

More on Snowdrops Here

 January - Snowdrop

January - Snowdrop


February - African Violet

 February - African Violet

February - African Violet

Many plants are grown for their foliage. Not so the African violet. Although without a single bud or blossom it is a beautiful pot plant, flowers are the reward everyone seeks and the owner of a non-blooming specimen suffers frustration. The essential aim of culture therefore is flowers.

Generally speaking, saintpaulias (African Violets) flower well in any light situation or in any sunny place where the brightness is somewhat diffused. The stronger the light, the deeper the color tones and the greater the floriferousness, within the limits of safety, of course.

Water African violets from the bottom by filling the saucer under the container with water. If the pot doesn't have a saucer, use a small bowl. Once the soil surface is moist, pour off all water remaining in the saucer. Check the saucer in half an hour and pour off any standing water.

Visit the American Violet Society  <-- Here


March - Daffodil

A daffodil is a daffodil, whether it announces spring with robust 5-inch flowers or heralds the season with cheery miniature blooms spanning a perky two inches or less in width. The miniature daffodils that are most typically available are charming, nearly carefree additions for any small area that needs touches of bright color. Like their larger relatives, miniature daffodils are troubled by very few pests because they’re toxic to most insects, and rabbits and deer turn their noses up at them. Perfect for the beginning gardener, these little beauties usually bloom between March and May and will brighten your garden for years to come.

Visit the American Daffodil Society.

More on Daffodil Here.

 

 

 March - Daffodil

March - Daffodil


April - Sweet pea

 April - Sweet Peas

April - Sweet Peas

Sweet peas are climbing plants that bear clusters of flowers in a wide variety of colors including red, pink, blue, white and lavender. The stems appear folded and the flowers resemble fringed butterflies. The old-fashioned varieties were selected for their vibrant colors and intense fragrance. Many modern cultivars are on the market offering sweet peas in almost every color except yellow, but not all of the newer Sweet pea varieties are fragrant. They have a long season of bloom and make excellent cut flowers.

More on Sweet Peas Here.


May - Lily of the valley

Lily of the Valley is a popular plant, grown for its scented flowers and for its ground-covering abilities in shady locations.  Convallaria majalis is an herbaceous perennial plant that forms extensive colonies by spreading underground stems called rhizomes. New upright shoots are formed at the ends of stolons in summer, these upright dormant stems are often called pips.These grow in the spring into new leafy shoots that still remain connected to the other shoots under ground, often forming extensive colonies.

More on Lily of the Valley Here.

 May - Lily of the valley

May - Lily of the valley


June - Rose

 June - Rose

June - Rose

The rose is the emblem of England and the national flower of the United States. It is the official flower of New York state; the wild rose, of Iowa; the prairie rose, of North Dakota; and the American Beauty, of the District of Columbia. Practical uses of roses, besides their importance as a source of perfume, include a delicate-flavored jelly made from the fruits, called rose hips, of some wild species. Thorny rambling roses, such as the Oriental multiflora rose, are much used as hedge and erosion control plants in agriculture, highway landscaping, and wildlife preserves. 


July - Larkspur

Larkspur is basically an annual version of delphinium, an all-time favorite perennial. Larkspur produces lovely spikes of blue, purple, pink, or white flowers in spring and summer. They look best clustered in small patches.  It is a  cool-season annual.  Larkspur is so easy to grow that it often self seeds in the garden, coming back year after year. Plant larkspur from seed directly in the garden in early spring. Larkspur doesn't like to be transplanted. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and ample water.  The pale and dark blues of larkspur are some of the prettiest you'll find in the garden, they come with little effort and make a beautiful cut flower

 July - Larkspur

July - Larkspur


August - Gladiolus

 August - Gladiolus

August - Gladiolus

The gladiolus is a beautiful flower that comes in a rainbow of colors. Gladioli are extremely popular both because they add a gorgeous splash of color to any flower arrangement and because they are easy to cultivate even for "brown thumbs." Gladioli grow from bulbs called corms. These must be dug up if you live in a cold climate. They produce large spikes of flowers that are beautiful and vibrant, and are great for flower arrangements or landscaping.


September - Aster

Perennial Aster flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. Aster flowers come in blues, purples and a variety of pinks. All Asters are yellow in the center of the flower. They are daisy-like in appearance, even though they are a member of the sunflower family. 
Great fall color or cut flower.

 September - Aster

September - Aster


October - Calendula

 October - Calendula

October - Calendula

Calendula,(calendula officinalis) is both beautiful and easy to grow, Calendula should be included in any herb gardener's list of must haves. Also known as pot marigold, this is a wonderful plant for the cooler regions as it tolerates lower temperatures well. Calendula is an annual. It must be grown every year. It has many medicinal purposes as well as makes a great soap as it retains its color during the soap making process.


November - Chrysanthemums

 November - Chrysanthemums

November - Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums are divided into two basic groups, garden hardy and exhibition. Garden hardy mums are new perennials capable of wintering in most northern latitudes. Exhibition varieties are not usually as sturdy. Garden hardies are defined by their ability to produce an abundance of small blooms with little if any mechanical assistance, such as staking, and withstanding wind and rain. Exhibition varieties, though, require staking, overwintering in a relatively dry, cool environment, and sometimes the addition of night lights.  Chrysanthemus make great cut flowers as they come in many colors and styles such as pom pom, cushion and daisy.


December - Holly

 December - Holly

December - Holly

Hollies are usually grown as ornamental plants. Large hollies can provide a focal point for a garden. Smaller hollies can be grouped as foundation plantings. They make good hedges and privacy screens. Evergreen species, especially those with brightly colored berries, provide winter interest in the garden.
Holly bushes are also a good choice for gardens intended to attract wildlife. They give shelter and protection from predators to many birds. Their berries provide food for both birds and wild animals.  Read more Here